2008-SWS
 
Workshop and Tours
 
 
We provide various guided tours for free for our guests abroad between Taipei and Tainan, Taiwan.
 

Free Tours: Plan A. Guandu Wetland, Taipei

 

Workshop and Tours
October 25 (Sat.) 2008
Program


Time

Activities

0930-1000

Gathering at Taipei Main Station (Eastern Gate 2)

1000-1200

Tour Guide at Guandu Wetland, Taipei

1200-1330

Lunch

1330-1400

Introduction ( Nature Center)
Keynote Speech:Wetland Management (Speakers: TBA)

1400-1500

1500-1520

Tea Break

1520-1730

Panelist Discussion

1800-2030

Banquet

2030

Back to Hotel



Free Tours: Plan B. Chigu Lagoon, Tainan

     
Workshop and Tours
October 25 (Sat.) 2008
Program



Time

Activities

0930-1000

Gathering at Taipei Main Station  
(Train Tours across Western Taiwan Scenic Corridor thru Taiwan High Speed Rail)
a. Taipei 7:30-  Tainan 9:15
b. Taipei 8:06-  Tainan 9:51

1000-1200

Tour Guide at Chigu Lagoon, Tainan

1200-1330

Lunch

1330-1400

Introduction (Black-faced Spoonbill Conservation and Management Center)

Keynote Speech:Coral Ecosystems
Speaker: Prof. Put O Ang, Jr. The Chinese University of Hong Kong (Ph.D., Botany, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada).

1400-1500

1500-1520

Tea Break

1520-1730

Panelist Discussion

1800-1900

Dinner

20:06-21:42

Tainan-Taipei (thru Taiwan High Speed Rail and back to Hotel, Taipei )

 

Free Tours


Workshop and Tours
October 26 (Sun.) 2008
Program

Time

Events

09:00~18:00

Tour A. City TourTaipei Zoo- Maokung Gondola- National Palace Museum- Taipei 101 Tower (Hosted by Taipei City Hall)

09:00~12:00

Tour B. Speech: Asian Wetlands, Global Position
SpeakerProf. Isidro T. Savillo
Venue4F, VIP room, Grand Formosa Regent, Taipei
41 Chung Shan N. Rd. Section 2, Taipei, Taiwan
 (http://www.grandformosa.com.tw/English/index.html)
(Hosted by Yo-Shen Foundation, Taipei, only for Taiwanese Participants)

18:00~

 Back to Hotel

 

Guandu Wetland

   -- The wetlands at Guandu are a riverine estuarine type, situated at the confluence of the Keelung and Tanshui Rivers, with 394 ha. It is mostly a Kandelia candel mangrove forested wetland environment. Common organisms include mudskippers and fiddler crabs. In summer, it is a breeding location for herons, egrets, and rails. In winter, it is an area for overwintering migrants. The Guandu Nature Park is currently managed by the Taipei Wild Bird Society.   

 

 Guandu Nature Park

 Introduction

“Guandu Nature Park” is a low-lying land area located southwest of the Guandu Plain in Taipei Basin, where the Keelung River joins the Tamshui River. The main environments of the park are freshwater ponds, brackish ponds, swamps, rice paddies and mounds. Because of the diverse ecological environment, the area is home to numerous varieties of animals and plants. The Guandu Park was established to help preserve the precious natural resources of this land. The area of the park is about 57 hectares, including the main facility area, core reserved area, and the outdoor observation area. With the aid of wooden trails, bird-watching cabins and tour guides, Guandu Nature Park will open the gateway to nature and allow you to experience the natural world close up.

On December 1st, 2001, the Wild Bird Society of Taipei (WBST) was entrusted by the Taipei City Government with management of the park, becoming the first nonprofit organization to do so. The Wild Bird Society’s years of care for this wetland were thus officially recognized. This is an excellent example of a governmental organization and a civic organization working together to achieve environmental preservation as well as public education.

After enjoying the beauty of the park, we hope that you will join us in cherishing and protecting this natural wetland.


Nature Center

The nature center serves as the information center, exhibition center, research center, and the service center of the park. On the first floor are the biological display, auditorium, presentation room and gift shop. On the second floor are the observatory & birdwatching area, special exhibition area, classroom, and the refreshments area. The major function of the center is to promote education about wetland ecological systems. Activities such as guided tours, multi-media shows, special exhibitions, lectures, tutoring, and consultations are arranged on a regular basis.

 

Riverside Biological Area

The various aquatic plants and water-tolerant plants along the shallow Kuei-Tse-Ken River form the typical riverside landscape of a wetland. Influenced by the ebb and flow of the tides, fishes and animals that have adapted to seawater are dominant in this area. Birds also feed and rest along the riverside.


Main Facility Area

The main facility area includes the nature center, bird-watching cabins, trails, streams and ponds. In the north part of the park, trees and shrubbery are distributed from the estuary to the low-altitude mountain area. This small but complete ecological landscape serves for educational purposes in addition to simply admiring the natural surroundings.

 

Coastal Forest Area

The main types of plant in this area are shrubs and trees that have adapted themselves to the harsh seashore environment. The leaves of these plants are smooth and large. Their thick inner tissues and well-developed cuticle allow them to reduce evaporation of water. These plants also have special structures to protect them from the salty environment. Some of the plants are areoceanic drift plants, whose lightweight and fibrous fruits ride the ocean currents, to take root in faraway places.


Bird-Watching Cabins

Bird-watching cabins allow us to admire the wild birds in their own environment without disturbing them. Remember, “Hush, and listen!” is the key to appreciate the stunning beauty of nature.

 

 

 

          

Freshwater Biological Area

The water supply for the pond comes from rain. The aquatic plants and water-tolerant plants in the pond have all evolved their own capabilities for living in the water. As these plants filter the water they also play an important role in controlling the quality of the water. More excitingly, the fishes and aquatic insects together create a splendid underwater world!

 

Stream Biological Area

The wet soil of the bank is the best environment for shade-tolerant plants. This area is typical of the environment of the Da-Tun mountain system at the northeast part of Guandu. The tall brush-pot trees (the Cyatheaceae family) are like umbrellas that block most of the sunshine. Some of the trees host butterflies. Frogs and aquatic insects are also abundant. If you wait long enough, you may encounter birds that come here looking for food!

 

Northern Taiwan Low-Elevation Forest Area

The landscape of this area is the broad-leaved trees and shrubs typical of northern Taiwan low-elevation (lower than 300m) forests. Some of them drop their leaves seasonally and they nest various birds. During the blooming season, butterflies and bees are abundant. Shrubs and decaying trees compose the lower layer of the forest and provide a habitat for insects. These small creatures make up 3/4 of the total species in the animal world and play a significant role in maintaining the equilibrium of the world’s ecosystem!

        

     

Chigu Lagoon, Cengwun River Estuary

Tainan's Cengwun River Estuary Black-faced Spoonbill Reserve is the most important wintering site in Taiwan for the Black-faced Spoonbills, with nearly 1/2 of the world's total of 1800 individuals found here. This area is comprised of 3218 ha of wetlands, and is predominated by waders, plovers, gulls, herons, and egrets. Commonly seen birds include the Dunlin and Kentish Plover. Rare species include White Stork, Black Stork, White Spoonbill, Whistling Swan, Baikal Teal, Besra, Gray-faced Buzzard Eagle, Chinese Sparrowhawk, Honey Buzzard, Osprey, Peregrine Falcon, Common Kestrel, Spotted Greenshank, Large Indian Pratincole, Little Tern, and Short-eared Owl. Fishery resources include Liza macrolepis, Valamugil cunnesius, Metapenaeus ensis, Cyclina sinensis, and molluscs.

      

Black-faced Spoonbill Conservation and Management Center

Introduction

The Black-faced Spoonbill Conservation and Management Center (BFS-Center) was established in November 28, 2005. Located nearby the Black-faced Spoonbill habitat area, Tainan, Taiwan, this center is leading to breakthrough processes on conservation and research in southern parts of Taiwan. According to the of “environmentally friendly” ideas by famous consultant architects in Taiwan, this center was designed as special shapes due to energy-saving reasons, with various spaces of display room, film screening room, casual dining room, as well as viewing platforms. Birdwatchers like this stopover to talk how many bird counts regarding to black-faced spoonbills in winters.

How many spaces that visitors can use?
The BFS-Center contains exhibition hall, ecological film screening room (as a conference and seminar rooms), casual dining room, viewing platforms as well as other spaces. Combined with purposes like ecological education and tourism, birdwatchers like to visit  BFS-Center before they conduct to their field trips.

Some display rooms consider to introduce and demonstrate black-faced spoonbill (BFS) and other rare birds at principal axis, so that visitors will fully recognize BFS as well as understand their precious values in the Chigu Lagoon. Regarding to the purposes of promoting the implementation of local students’ ecological education, stimulating homeland environment cares, and enhancing public ecological awareness, this center is well organized by several stakeholders.

Where is the center location?
Located nearby old dike from the Tsengwen River estuary in Tainan County, the local government selected a close stopover from birdwatching kiosks near, but with a safe bird-flying distance, from the main habitats of BFS.


What is the display during 2008?

1. The Black-faced Spoonbill Lifecycle
2. Wetland Ecology  

3. Environmental Movement

 

   
          

    

 

“Wetscape” in Southern Taiwan

         

 

References